Intelligent Sugar

We love sugar.

"What we need is not necessarily less sugar, what we need is the right sugars," Dr. rer. nat. Johannes F. Coy.Dr. rer. nat. Johannes F. Coy

The term "healthy sugars" means that our organism, and especially our brain, is optimally supplied with energy. The blood sugar level does not rise abruptly and works against tooth decay. The right sugar combinations even support weight loss. Hard to believe, but now scientifically proven. Dr. rer. nat. Johannes F. Coy also speaks of intelligent sugars, which have the following special features:

Consistent energy supplier without a rapid rise in blood glucose levels

Stable blood sugar level

Low-calorie or calorie-free

Protects teeth from cavities and plaque

D-Tagatose

D-Tagatose (natural simple sugar) combines a strong sweetening power with a low glycemic index (GI=3) and is particularly suitable for diabetics. D-Tagatose is not metabolised by cavity-causing bacteria in your mouth and is therefore tooth-friendly.[1] Eating foods that contain D-tagatose instead of sugar causes the blood sugar level to rise less than eating foods which contain sugar.[2] The sugar content of D-tagatose in the mouth is lower than that of sugary foods.

[1] Imfeld, T. (1998): Telemetric evaluation of D-tagatose provided by MD Foods Ingredients Amba, Denmark, with regard to the product’s qualification as being safe for teeth“. Study performed after different plaque-adaption periods. Dental Institute, University of Zurich, Switzerland.[2] DR. RER. NAT. JOHANNES F. COY, "Fit mit Zucker", Seite 72 f., 2019

Infographic
Galactose

Galactose

Galactose is a natural component of milk sugar, but seldom occurs in nature as a free sugar. Its great advantage is that it is absorbed in the cells without insulin. This means that energy can be supplied without a rise in blood sugar and without the release of insulin. [3][4][5]

[3] See Roser, Martin et al. (2009): Metabolism of galactose in the brain and liver of rats and its conversion into glutamate and other amino acids. J Neural Transm (Vienna) 116 (2): 131-139.

[4] Cf. Kosterlitz, H.; Wedler, H. W. (1933): Untersuchungen über die Verwertung der Galaktose in physiologischen und pathologischen Zuständen. Z. Ges. Exp. Med. 87 (1): 397-404

[5] Cf. Lembke, A.; Pause, B. (1989): On the cariostatic efficacy of D(+)-galactose. Z Stomatol 86 (4): 179-189. Wirksamkeit von D(+)-Galactose. Z Stomatol 86 (4): 179–189.

Isomaltulose

Isomaltulose occurs naturally in some sugar-rich foods such as honey or sugar cane. For use in the kitchen, it is extracted from natural beet sugar in a special fermentation process. The lower insulin release with isomaltulose has less effect on fat burning and thus also improves the "afterburning phase" [6].

[3] West, Daniel J. et al. (2011): Isomaltulose Improves Postexercise Glycemia by Reducing CHO Oxidation in T1DM. Med Sci Sports Exerc 43 (2): 204-210.

[Link to abstract.]

Trehalose

Trehalose is a natural sugar and has always been part of our diet. The main food sources are edible mushrooms, which is why the sugar is sometimes referred to as mushroom sugar, or obsoletely as mycose. Trehalose is also found in honey, in crustaceans such as lobster, shrimps and prawns, as well as in products that use yeast in their production, such as bread or beer.

Child and care-can

The perfect drink for children.

Children love sweets. They like to snack on chocolate, sweets or fruit gummies and drink sweet drinks such as orange juice or lemonade. Children's products such as children's quark or fruit juice drinks often contain high amounts of added sugar. This is anything but good for dental health: children in particular suffer frequently from cavities.

Smart sugars are tooth-friendly and provide sweetness and energy in a way that is gentle on teeth. This makes it easy to create energy-giving foods and drinks that cause little or no damage to children's teeth.

FAQ

How do sugars affect dental health?

Smart sugars are tooth-friendly and provide sweetness and energy in a way that is gentle on teeth. So they can easily be used to make energy-giving foods and drinks that cause little or no damage to children's teeth.


How can I achieve the best possible result?

The best result is achieved with a long-term consumption of both drinks. We recommend you start with our 30-day cell cure.


Can children drink the CARE Drink without any problems?

Children can safely consume our CARE Drink, as well as the sugars it contains. These are tooth-friendly and provide children with energy and the desired sweetness in a gentle way.


Is D-tagatose natural?

D-Tagatose is a natural sugar found in nature in some fruits and in processed dairy products. Notable amounts are found for example in apples, pineapples and oranges, and in smaller amounts in heated cow's milk and in fermented products such as yoghurt. [1]


[1] Rymon Lipinski, Gert-Wolfhard von (2007): Handbuch Süssungsmittel. Properties and application. Hamburg: Behr's Verlag. 2nd, fully revised edition.


Is trehalose natural?

Trehalose is a natural sugar and has always been part of our diet. The main food sources are edible mushrooms, which is why the sugar is sometimes referred to as mushroom sugar or obsoletely as mycose. Trehalose is also found in honey, in crustaceans such as lobster, shrimp and prawns, and in products made with yeast, such as bread and beer. In prehistoric times, when humans resorted to protein sources from the insect kingdom as well, trehalose intake was still much higher than today1. It is therefore not surprising that we even have an extra enzyme for its digestion in our intestines.
The food industry is now also taking advantage of the high temperature stability of trehalose and uses the starch-derived sugar in ice cream, for example.


Does D-tagatose promote intestinal flora?

There is scientific evidence that D-tagatose has a probiotic effect. In contrast to the oral flora, some types of bacteria in the intestinal flora can use tagatose as a food source. Various lactobacilli and some other lactic acid bacteria can ferment the sugar and form short-chain fatty acids such as butyric acid (butyrate) from it. 5. On the one hand, this promotes the growth of beneficial intestinal germs. On the other hand, studies have shown that butyrate produced by the intestinal flora supplies the intestinal cells with energy and has a health-promoting effect on them. [4]


[4]Leonel, Alda J.; Alvarez-Leite, Jacqueline I. (2012): Butyrate: implications for intestinal function. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 15


Does trehalose affect my blood sugar level?

Trehalose is enzymatically broken down into its two glucose building blocks in the small intestine. However, these enter the bloodstream relatively slowly.


The enzyme trehalase is widely distributed over the mucous membrane of the small intestine. Consequently, the digestion of trehalose takes place over a longer period of time, during which the released glucose only enters the bloodstream in bits and pieces. The blood sugar level rises significantly less than with pure glucose. The insulin release is also lower after the consumption of trehalose than after the consumption of glucose or sucrose 3. However, the exact glycemic index is difficult to determine, as the absorption speed and effect on the blood sugar level depends on the individual trehalase activity.


Does D-tagatose affect my blood sugar level?

No. Due to the low and also very slow absorption, only little D-tagatose enters the bloodstream. There is no significant rise in blood sugar and no associated high insulin release. D-Tagatose therefore has a very low glycemic index of just 3% (compared to glucose with a glycemic index of 100%). [5]


[5] Atkinson, Fiona S.; Foster-Powell, Kaye; Brand-Miller, Jennie C. (2008): International tables of glycemic index and glycemic load values: 2008. Diabetes Care 31 (12): 2281-2283.


Is D-Tagatose also suitable for lactose intolerance, fructose intolerance or celiac disease?

In conventional quantities (1-2 teaspoons per meal), D-Tagatose is well tolerated and also suitable for lactose intolerance and celiac disease. However, as D-tagatose is largely utilised in the large intestine, to be on the safe side we recommend only using the sugar if there are currently no intestinal complaints as a result of successful nutritional therapy.


Despite the structural similarity to fructose, D-tagatose is absorbed in the intestine via a different pathway (passive diffusion) and does not influence fructose absorption. D-Tagatose is tolerated by most people with intestinal fructose intolerance. Nevertheless, we recommend testing the individual tolerance of D-tagatose by initially taking small amounts in case of very severe fructose intolerance.


(Note: intestinal fructose intolerance must not be confused with the very rare hereditary fructose intolerance, for which D-tagatose is basically unsuitable).


Can I use galactose as a diabetic?

Galactose offers a good sugar alternative, especially for diabetics, and is also recommended by many diabetologists. As early as the 1930s, when there were still few therapeutic options available, doctors at the Charité hospital in Berlin successfully treated diabetes patients with galactose as a sugar substitute. [6] Since then, galactose has proven its worth in diabetes therapy many times over.
A major problem in type 2 diabetes (adult-onset diabetes) is the insulin resistance of the cells. The hormone insulin normally acts like a key that opens the door for glucose into the muscle and fat cells. Glucose can flow into the cells for energy, causing the blood glucose level to drop. If these cells no longer respond sufficiently to the insulin signal, as in the case of type 2 diabetes, glucose remains in the blood and the blood sugar level is permanently elevated. At the same time, despite a high supply of sugar in the blood, the cells become depleted of energy and have to cover their energy needs extensively by breaking down fat. In the process, so-called ketone bodies accumulate, which lead to ketoacidosis and, in the worst case, to a ketoacidotic coma, which is feared in diabetes.


Galactose offers the advantage that it reaches the cells independently of insulin. The blood sugar level remains largely balanced and the cells continue to be supplied with energy from sugar. At the same time, galactose does not contribute to the release of further insulin hormone and thus spares the pancreas.


[6] Kosterlitz, H.; Wedler, H. W. (1933): Untersuchungen über die Verwertung der Galaktose in physiologischen und pathologischen Zuständen. Z. Ges. Exp. Med. 87 (1): 397-404.


Can I use isomaltulose as a diabetic?

Isomaltulose is also suitable for diabetics as part of their nutritional therapy. Isomaltulose puts less strain on the blood sugar level than conventional household sugar, thus saving insulin and relieving the pancreas. Due to the slow and steady supply of glucose, isomaltulose also prevents hypoglycemia.


Can I use D-tagatose as a diabetic?

D-Tagatose can also be used very well by diabetics and is an ideal sugar alternative that sweetens well without having a noticeable effect on blood sugar levels. However, diabetics should note that tagatose contributes only slightly to the sugar supply due to its low absorption. To avoid hypoglycemia and to supply the body evenly with glucose (dextrose), the combination of D-tagatose with trehalose, galactose or isomaltulose is recommended, especially for insulin-dependent diabetics.


Why is galactose also called brain sugar?

Galactose is a beneficial energy source for brain and nerve cells due to its insulin-independent absorption and utilisation.


Similar to muscle cells, brain cells can also be affected by insulin resistance. In this case, the insulin receptors, i.e. the antennae on the cell surface that receive the insulin signal, are disturbed and hardly transmit the signal for glucose uptake into the cell. The glucose influx into the brain cells is suppressed and the brain suffers from a lack of energy. This can contribute to poor concentration and memory difficulties, but also to serious dementia symptoms such as Alzheimer's disease [7,8].


Galactose can be absorbed by the brain and nerve cells and used for energy production even in cases of insulin resistance. This secures the energy supply and prevents losses in concentration, coordination and memory. At the same time, the consumption of galactose only leads to a low insulin release and thus barely contributes to a further worsening of insulin resistance.


[7] Dineley, Kelly T.; Jahrling, Jordan B.; Denner, Larry (2014): Insulin resistance in Alzheimer's disease. Neu-robiol Dis 72 Pt A: 92-103.
[8] Ma, Lina; Wang, Jieyu; Li, Yun (2015): Insulin resistance and cognitive dysfunction. Clin Chim Acta 444: 18-23.


What is the effect of isomaltulose during sport?

Due to the slower glucose production from isomaltulose compared to sucrose (household sugar), the body is supplied with sugar energy more evenly and over a longer period of time. This can be an advantage especially in strength and endurance sports.
Due to the lower blood sugar load and the consequently lower insulin level 2, the use of isomaltulose instead of sucrose or glucose also supports fat burning (fat oxidation). Insulin represents an inhibitory factor that significantly slows down fat oxidation with other high-glycemic sugars. The lower insulin release with isomaltulose has less of an effect on fat burning and thus also improves the "after-burn" phase [9]


[9] West, Daniel J. et al. (2011): Isomaltulose Improves Postexercise Glycemia by Reducing CHO Oxidation in T1DM. Med Sci Sports Exerc 43 (2): 204-210.